Would you like to make English your default language on this site?
2009-11-16

Policewomen unite against discrimination

TEXT SIZE
Women cadets in formation during the 94th graduation ceremony at the police institute in Bogotá, on Nov. 5. Latin American representatives met in La Paz, Bolivia to demand gender equality within the continent’s law and order institutions.

Women cadets in formation during the 94th graduation ceremony at the police institute in Bogotá, on Nov. 5. Latin American representatives met in La Paz, Bolivia to demand gender equality within the continent’s law and order institutions.

Monday, Nov. 16

LA PAZ, Bolivia – Around 120 policewomen, representing 12 countries on the continent, met in La Paz in the first week of November to analyze respect for gender equality and human rights in America’s law and order institutions.

Officers from Argentina, Chile, Peru, Ecuador, Cuba, Paraguay, Nicaragua, Panama, Brazil, the United States, Costa Rica and Bolivia demanded gender equality and the same opportunities as their male colleagues to develop a career serving their communities.

The La Paz Declaration, read by a Nicaraguan policewoman, calls for a review of police regulatory frameworks on the continent, reported El Diario, for gender equality to cover issues ranging from the use of “sexist language” to the “visualization” of woman’s presence in law and order institutions.

The delegates also requested sensitivity from high-ranking officers to put an end to the idea that being a woman can prove to be an obstacle to developing a professional career or “cause for exclusion from the assignment of responsibilities, roles and rights.”

Bolivian Lt. Col. Rosa Lema, one the event organizers, explained to Los Tiempos that the declaration also requests the adaptation of police infrastructures to women’s needs, increased protection, investigation and follow-up in cases where the rights of agents are violated and revisions to “training course content in police institutes to include issues on human rights, gender and sexual violence.”

This point is considered vital by Bolivian policewoman. According to a report published by La Prensa in August, women officers feel like they are relegated to desk or kitchen jobs in the corps. The report resulted from an investigation by the country’s House of Representatives, which received 75 reports of sexual harassment, violence and discrimination from women police officers in police institutes during a one-year period.

Bolivian figures reflect a problem that runs through the entire region; of the country’s 26,000 police officers, just 3,000 are women. This was the reason why Bolivia was chosen to host the American meeting, because it is one of the countries where the differences in conditions for women police officers are most visible. Another meeting will be held again in 2010 to follow-up on the proposals from this first meeting.

Do you like this article?

0

Add Your Comment

1 Comment

  1. mariasol 11/11/2010

    Women can do more than men and since they are afraid we will show everything we know, they are afraid to be overshadowed, that is why they didn't let us do most things to the contrary thanks to Eva we were able to show we are valuable and that we are able. Therefore, thanks to Eva, we women didn't end up as a bother but men turned out to be sexist, insensitive and beastly. We don't have to pay attention to those comments that are so silly rather we have to show we can, that we know how; that is why we don't get INTIMIDATED, YES LET US SHOW THAT WE CAN DO IT THAT WE KNOW HOW THAT WE ARE ONE MORE THAT WE ARE UNIQUE BECAUSE WITHOUT US THEY WOULD NOT BE ABLE TO GO ON... I don't mean to say that men should be left behind because without men we wouldn't be able to feel good. without a man we women are nothing, but there is a clear difference it's that we are all EQUAL and nothing is going to change

Poll
Do you consider organized crime a threat to stability in your country?
View Results