Los Angeles authorities officially confirmed the first death related to the 2018-2019 flu season. They are urging members of the public to get vaccinated and to practice good hygiene to prevent the spread of the flu.

First Flu Death Of The 2018-2019 Season

In a statement, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health confirmed the first death related to the 2018-2019 flu season. Evidently, the person who died was an elderly individual with a number of underlying conditions.

“We extend our condolences to the family for their loss. This is a sad reminder that the flu can be a serious illness, especially for the elderly, young children and people with weakened immune systems. I would like to remind everyone that even if you’re healthy, you can still get seriously sick from the flu and spread the illness to others,” said Los Angeles County Health Officer Muntu Davis, MD, MPH.

Protection During Flu Season

Davis also reminded the public that immunization is still the best means of protecting the self and others from contracting the flu. Furthermore, good hygiene practices such as proper handwashing, covering the mouth when one coughs or sneezes, not touching the eyes, nose, or mouth, and staying home when sick are equally important in preventing the spread of the flu.

Those who are more at risk of serious illness or death from the flu are children younger than five years old, adults over 65 years old, pregnant women, those with chronic illnesses, and those who are overweight or have diabetes. The most common complication related to the flu is pneumonia.

Anyone who begins to feel ill must immediately seek medical care whether or not they have been immunized. Symptoms of the flu may include cough, fever, sore throat, fatigue, headaches, runny or stuffy nose, and muscle and body aches.

Flu Cases And Deaths

Thousands of people in the United States are hospitalized each year because of the flu or flu-related illnesses. In the 2017-2018 flu season, Los Angeles County reported 278 flu deaths, which is higher than any flu season deaths since they began to be reported in 2010.

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