As the youngest woman ever elected to Congress, 29-year-old Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez has attracted much media attention.

A young outspoken woman who defines herself as “an educator, an organizer, a working-class New Yorker,” Ocasio-Cortez has positioned herself as an outsider who isn’t afraid of speaking truth to power.

While her radical political positions — from abolishing ICE to Medicare for all — are responsible for some of that publicity, her fashion choices have also drawn a lot of scrutiny.

RELATED Democrats nominate Pelosi as speaker despite opposition from dozens

“I’ll tell you something,” Washington Examiner reporter Eddie Scarry tweeted on Nov. 16, “that jacket and coat don’t look like a girl who struggles.”

It seems that some critics just can’t accept the fact that an unapologetic Democratic socialist like Ocasio-Cortez — who calls for a more equal distribution of wealth and fair shake to workers — can also wear designer clothes.

To a historian like me who writes about fashion and politics, the attention to Ocasio-Cortez’s clothing as a way to criticize her politics is an all-too-familiar line of attack.

RELATED Nevada Sen. Cortez Masto becomes first Latina to lead Democratic electoral panel

Ocasio-Cortez isn’t the first woman or even the first outsider to receive such treatment.

In particular, I’m reminded of Clara Lemlich, a young radical socialist who used fashion as a form of empowerment while she fought for workers’ rights.

Lemlich — like Ocasio-Cortez — wasn’t afraid to take on big business while wearing fancy clothes.

RELATED Record number of women elected to Congress

‘We like new hats’

In 1909, when she was only 23, Lemlich defied the male union leadership whom she saw as too hesitant and out of touch.

In what would come to be known as the “Uprising of the 20,000,” Lemlich led thousands of garment workers — the majority of them young women — to walk out from their workplace and go on a strike.

That 14-week strike between November 1909 and February 1910 was the largest strike by women to date, turning what was thought of as a disorganized workforce into a united, political force.

A 1912 group photograph of the International Ladies’ Garment Workers’ Union Local 25 Executive Board, which includes Clara Lemlich (top row, third from left).
Kheel Center/flickr, CC BY

Strikers demanded better wages, hours and working conditions. But they also called to end the pervasive sexual harassment in the shops, safer workrooms and for dressing rooms with mirrors and hooks on the walls, so workers could protect their elegant clothes during the workday.

“We like new hats as well as other young women. Why shouldn’t we?” argued Lemlich, justifying strikers’ demands. And when they went out to the streets, strikers were also wearing those nice clothes of theirs, updated according to the latest trends.

As historian Nan Enstad has shown, insisting on their right to maintain a fashionable appearance was not a frivolous pursuit of poor women living beyond their means. It was an important political strategy in strikers’ struggle to gain rights and respect as women, workers and Americans.

Two women strikers on picket line during the ‘Uprising of the 20,000’ in New York City.
Library of Congress

When they picketed the streets wearing their best clothes, strikers challenged the image of the “deserving poor” that depicted female workers as helpless victims deserving of mercy.

Wearing a fancy dress or a hat signaled their economic independence and their respectability as ladies. But it also spoke to their right to be taken seriously and to have their voices heard.

Activism and fashion can work together

The strikers’ fashionable appearance was heavily criticized by middle-class observers and the male union leadership. To them, it was evidence that these women weren’t really struggling as much as they claimed to be.

Sarah Comstock, a reporter for Collier’s magazine, commented that “I had come to observe the Crisis of Social Condition; but apparently this was a Festive Occasion,” pointing to the fact that the strikers’ clothes made them look like they didn’t have any real grievances.

“Lingerie waists were elaborate, pufftowered,” she observed. “There were picture turbans and di’mont pendants.”

The New York Sun also mocked the strikers, calling them the “unwonted leisure class…all dressed in holiday attire” and showing no evidence of harsh treatment.

To critics like Comstock and the New York Sun, the fact that strikers aspired for better working conditions that would allow them to go beyond mere survival — and would provide them with disposable income to spend their wages as they saw fit — wasn’t a privilege that working-class women should have.

Despite the criticism, Lemlich and her fellow strikers were able to win concessions from factory owners for most of their demands. They also turned Local 25 of the International Ladies Garment Workers Union into one of the most influential labor unions in the country, changing for the better the lives of millions of workers like themselves.

But more importantly, Lemlich and her colleagues changed the perception of what politically radical women should look like. They demonstrated that socialism and labor struggles were not in opposition to fashionable appearances.

Today, their legacy is embodied in Ocasio-Cortez’s message. In fact, if Lemlich were alive today, she would probably smile at Ocasio-Cortez’s response to her critics.

The reason some journalists “can’t help but obsess about my clothes [and] rent,” she tweeted, is because “women like me aren’t supposed to run for office — or win.”

Ocasio-Cortez has begun to fashion an image for women who, as her worn-out campaign shoes can attest, not only know how to “talk the talk,” but can also “walk the walk.”

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s campaign shoes, on loan to the Cornell Costume & Textile Collection for the exhibition ‘Women Empowered: Fashions from the Frontline,’ on display from Dec. 6, 2018 to March 31, 2019.
Rachel Getman/Cornell Costume & Textile Collection

Einav Rabinovitch-Fox is a visiting assistant professor at Case Western Reserve University.

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Women of the next U.S. Congress

Rep.-elects, from left to right, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., Debbie Mucarsel-Powell, D-Fla., and Abby Finkenauer, D-Iowa, huddle together to stay warm during the group photo for the new members of the upcoming 116th Congress outside the U.S. Capitol. Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI | License Photo

Rep.-elects, from left to right, Donna Shalala, D-Fla., Mary Gay Scanlon, D-Pa., and Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., talk during photo shoot for the new members. Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI | License Photo

Ocasio-Cortez casts her vote on Election Day in New York City. At 29, she is the youngest woman elected to Congress in history. Photo by John Angelillo/UPI | License Photo

Sen.-elect Kyrsten Sinema, D-Ariz., is the first woman to serve in the Senate from Arizona. She previously served in the House since 2013. Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI | License Photo

Sen.-elect Jacky Rosen, D-Nev., attends a meeting with Democratic Party leadership on Capitol Hill after the midterm election. She previously served in the House. Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI | License Photo

Rep.-elect Jahana Hayes (L), D-Conn., walks with newly elected Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., as they leave the group photo for the new members. Omar is the first Somali American to be elected to Congress — and along with Rashida Tlaib of Michigan — the first Muslim. Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI | License Photo

Rep.-elect Jennifer Wexton, D-Va., speaks to reporters. Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI | License Photo

Rep.-elect Susan Wild, D-Pa., won a special election to complete the term of Charlie Dent, who retired. Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI | License Photo

Rep.-elect Mikie Sherrill, D-N.J., speaks to reporters outside the U.S. Capitol. She is a former U.S. Navy helicopter pilot and federal prosecutor. Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI | License Photo

Rep.-elect Chrissy Houlahan, D-Pa., is a military veteran and former high school teacher. Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI | License Photo

President Barack Obama honors the 2016 National Teacher of the Year Jahana Hayes of Connecticut. Hayes, D-Conn., will begin her first term in the House in January. File Pool Photo by Olivier Douliery/UPI | License Photo

Rep.-elect Haley Stevens (L), D-Mich., served as chief of staff on the auto bailout task force that rescued GM and Chrysler during the Obama administration. Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI | License Photo

Rep.-elect Katie Hill, D-Calif., will begin her first term in the House in January 2019. Photo courtesy of Katie Hill for Congress/Facebook

Rep.-elect Lucy McBath, D-Ga., was inspired to run for office after her 17-year-old son Jordan Davis was shot to death in 2012 by a man who complained Jordan was playing music too loud. Photo courtesy of Lucy McBath/Twitter

Rep.-elect Lauren Underwood, D-Ill., is a registered nurse. Photo courtesy of Lauren Underwood for Congress/Facebook

Rep.-elect Cindy Axne, D-Iowa, is a small business owner. Photo courtesy of Cindy Axne/Twitter

Rep.-elect Lori Trahan, D-Mass., will begin her first term in the House in January 2019. Photo courtesy of Lori Trahan/Twitter

Rep.-elect Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich., is one of two Muslims elected to Congress. The other is Omar. Photo courtesy of Rashida Tlaib For Congress/Facebook

Rep.-elect Angie Craig, D- Minn., is the first openly gay member of Minnesota’s congressional delegation. Photo courtesy of Angie Craig for Congress/Facebook

Rep.-elect Susie Lee, D-Nev., has had a career in nonprofits that serve the needy and education. Photo courtesy of Susie Lee for Congress/Facebook

Rep.-elect Deb Haaland, D-N.M., is one of only two Native Americans to ever be elected to Congress. Photo courtesy of Deb Haaland for Congress/Facebook

Rep.-elect Kendra Horn, D-Okla., is the first Democrat to serve her disctrict since 1975. Photo courtesy of Kendra Horn for Congress/Facebook

Rep.-elect Madeleine Dean, D-Pa., will begin her first term in the House in January 2019. Photo courtesy of Mad4PA/Facebook

Rep.-elect Veronica Escobar, D-Texas, is one of the first two Hispanic women to win congressional seats in Texas. Photo courtesy of Veronica Escobar for Congress/Facebook

Rep.-elect Lizzie Fletcher, D-Texas, will begin her first term in the House in January 2019. Photo courtesy of Lizzie Pannill Fletcher for Congress/Facebook

Rep.-elect Xochitl Torres Small, D-N.M., will begin her first term in the House in January 2019. Photo courtesy of Xochitl for Congress/Facebook

Rep.-elect Elaine Luria, D-Va., is a former commander in the U.S. Navy. Photo courtesy of Elaine Luria for Congress/Facebook

Rep.-elect Abigail Spanberger, D-N.J., is the first Democrat to serve her district since 1971 — and the first woman ever. Photo courtesy of Spanberger For Congress/Facebook

Rep.-elect Kim Schrier, D-Wash., is a pediatrician. Photo courtesy of Dr. Kim Schrier/Facebook

Rep.-elect Sharice Davids, D-Kan., will begin her first term in the House in January 2019. Photo courtesy of Sharice For Congress/Facebook

Rep.-elect Carol Miller, R-W.Va., will begin a new term serving West Virginia in the House in January of 2019. Miller previously served in the House, from 2007-2013. Photo courtesy of Carol for Congress/Facebook

Rep. Sylvia Garcia, D-Texas, is one of two of the state’s first Hispanic women to be elected to Congress. Photo by Dereksd34/Wikimedia Commons

Rep.-elect Ayanna Pressley speaks at a rally in Cambridge, Mass. on September 8. Photo courtesy of ElizabethForMA/Flickr

House Republican Marsha Blackburn, R-Tenn., makes remarks on GOP plans for “The American Health Care Reform Act of 2017.” She has been elected to the Senate. File Photo by Mike Theiler/UPI | License Photo

Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, speaks to reporters after voting no on cloture for Supreme Court Justice nominee Brett Kavanaugh. Murkowski has served in the Senate since 2002. File Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI | License Photo

Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., speaks to reporters after the Senate held a cloture vote for Supreme Court Justice nominee Brett Kavanaugh. Feinstein has served in the Senate since 1992. File Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI | License Photo

Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., questions witnesses about Supreme Court nominee Brett M. Kavanaugh. Harris has served in the Senate since 2017. File Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI | License Photo

Sen. Mazie Hirono, D-Hawaii, speaks on day four of the Democratic National Convention in 2016. Hirono has served in the Senate since 2013. File Photo by Ray Stubblebine/UPI | License Photo

Sen. Joni Ernst, R-Iowa, participates in a meeting on trade. Ernst has served in the Senate since 2015. File Photo by Chris Kleponis/UPI | License Photo

Sen. Tammy Duckworth, D-Ill., leaves the Senate chamber in April with her newborn daughter Maile Pearl Bowlsbey. In the spring, Duckworth became the first sitting U.S. senator to give birth. The Senate subsequently changed its rules to allow babies on the Senate floor. File Photo by Ken Cedeno/UPI | License Photo

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., raises her fist and cheers at a protest against President Donald Trump’s healthcare proposals. Warren has served in the Senate since 2013 and is frequently mentioned as a possible presidential candidate. File Photo by Erin Schaff/UPI | License Photo

Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, talks with reporters about the successful Senate vote to reopen the government after a shutdown in January. Collins has served in the Senate since 1997. File Photo by Erin Schaff/UPI | License Photo

Sen. Debbie Stabenow, D-Mich., speaks on Medicaid cuts under Trump’s healthcare bill in March 2017. Stabenow has served in the Senate since 2001. File Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI | License Photo

Christine Blasey Ford and Senate Judiciary Committee hearing

Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., listens during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on the Supreme Court nomination of Brett Kavanaugh in September. The judge apologized to her for some remarks he made in the hearing under her questioning regarding his alcohol consumption. Klobuchar has served in the Senate since 2007. File Photo by Melina Mara/UPI | License Photo

Sen. Tina Smith, D-Minn., re-enacts her swearing-in; 2018 is her first year in the Senate. File Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI | License Photo

Sen. Deb Fischer, R-Neb., leaves the Senate floor during debate on healthcare reform and repeal in July 2017. Fischer has served in the Senate since 2013. File Photo by Erin Schaff/UPI | License Photo

Sen. Maggie Hassan, D-N.H., leaves the Senate floor during debate on healthcare reform and repeal. Hassan has served in the Senate since 2017. File Photo by Erin Schaff/UPI | License Photo

Sen. Jeanne Shaheen, D-N.H., talks with reporters on her way to the Senate floor to debate healthcare reform and repeal. Shaheen has served in the Senate since 2009. File Photo by Erin Schaff/UPI | License Photo

Sen. Catherine Cortez Masto, D-Nev., walks to a meeting of Senate Democrats. Cortez Masto has served in the Senate since 2017. File Photo by Erin Schaff/UPI | License Photo

Sen. Cindy Hyde-Smith, R-Miss., has served in the Senate since April of 2018. As the incumbent candidate, Hyde-Smith won in a run-off election against Democrat Mike Espy for the final Senate seat of the 2018 midterms. Hyde-Smith is the first woman elected to the upper chamber from Mississippi, and will finish a term that ends in two years.

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., speaks on the need for new sexual harassment reporting guidelines for Capitol Hill. Gillibrand has served in the Senate since 2009. File Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI | License Photo

Sen. Maria Cantwell, D-Wash., gives the keynote address at the annual Truman Dinner St. Louis in 2015. Cantwell has served in the Senate since 2001. File Photo by Bill Greenblatt/UPI | License Photo

Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., speaks on the Senate Republican healthcare bill. Murray has served in the Senate since 2017. File Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI | License Photo

Sen. Tammy Baldwin, D-Wis., speaks at the campaign rally for Wisconsin Democrats in October. Baldwin has served in the Senate since 2013. File Photo by Kamil Krzaczynski/UPI | License Photo

Sen. Shelley Moore Capito, R-W.Va., listens to speakers at a news conference with Ivanka Trump about the child tax credit. Capito has served in the Senate since 2015. File Photo by Erin Schaff/UPI | License Photo

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., speaks at a press conference. Pelosi has served in the House since 1987. With Democrats in control of the House again in 2019, she could again become speaker of the House. File Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI | License Photo

Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, D-Fla., participates in the March for Our Lives rally. Wasserman Schultz has served in the House since 2013. A man who targeted prominent Democrats with mailed bomb threats in October used Wasserman Schultz’s Florida office as the return address. File Photo by David Tulis /UPI | License Photo

Rep. Martha Roby, R-Ala., speaks at the child tax credit news conference, with Ivanka Trump in the background. Roby has served in the House since 2011. File Photo by Erin Schaff/UPI | License Photo

Rep. Terri Sewell, D-Ala., and Rep. Joyce Beatty, D-Ohio, wear black in support of the Me Too movement and Time’s Up campaign. Sewell has served in the House since 2011 and Beatty has served since 2013. File Photo by Erin Schaff/UPI | License Photo

Rep. Joyce Beatty, D-Ohio, speaks on day four of the Democratic National Convention in 2016. Beatty has served in the House since 2013. File Photo by Ray Stubblebine/UPI | License Photo

Ann Kirkpatrick, D-Ariz., speaks at a rally for Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton in 2016. Kirkpatrick has served in the House since 2008. File Photo by Art Foxall/UPI | License Photo

Rep. Barbara Lee, D-Calif., speaks at a press conference on Donald Trump’s first 100 days in office in April 2017. She was among Democrats urging the president to seek more moderate policies. Lee has served in the House since 1998. File Photo by Erin Schaff/UPI | License Photo

Rep. Jackie Speier, D-Calif., laughs during a photo op for members of Congress wearing black in support of the Me Too movement and Time’s Up campaign. Speier has served in the House since 2013. File Photo by Erin Schaff/UPI | License Photo

Rep. Anna Eshoo, D-Calif., testifies before a House Financial Services Committee hearing about the Lehman Bros. bankruptch in 2010. Eshoo has served in the House since 1993. File Photo by Madeline Marshall/UPI | License Photo

Chairwoman Rep. Zoe Lofgren, D-Calif., presides over a House ethics subcommittee hearing on violations by Rep. Charlie Rangel in 2010. Lofgren has served in the House since 1995. File Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI | License Photo

Congressional Asian Pacific American Caucus Chairwoman, Rep. Judy Chu, D-Calif., speaks at the Democratic National Convention in 2016. Chu has served in the House since 2009. File Photo by Ray Stubblebine/UPI | License Photo

Rep. Doris Matsui, D-Calif., attends a House Rules Committee in Washington, D.C. on March 20, 2010. Matsui has served in the House since 2005. File Photo by Alexis C. Glenn/UPI | License Photo

Rep. Grace Napolitano, D-Calif., member of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, participates in a forum on the risks of privatizing Social Security for America’s Latino population in 2005. Napolitano has served in the House since 1998. File Photo by Roger L. Wollenberg/UPI | License Photo

Rep. Karen Bass, D-Calif., speaks at the Democratic National Convention. Bass has served in the House since 2013. File Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI | License Photo

Rep. Linda Sanchez, D-Calif., speaks at the Democratic National Convention in 2016. Sanchez has served in the House since 2003. File Photo by Pat Benic/UPI | License Photo

Rep. Lucille Roybal-Allard, D-Calif., introduces the Children’s Act for Responsible Employment, aimed at protecting young farmworkers, in 2005. Roybal-Allard has served in the House since 1992 and was the first Mexican-American woman elected to Congress. File Photo by Roger L. Wollenberg/UPI | License Photo

Rep. Maxine Waters, D-Calif., arrives on the red carpet as Time celebrates its annual list of the 100 most influential people in April. Waters has served in the House since 1990. She has been a target of criticism by Donald Trump. File Photo by Monika Graff/UPI | License Photo

Rep. Susan Davis, D-Calif., speaks after accepting a congressional leadership award from the Military Officers Association of America in 2009. Davis has served in the House since 2001. File Photo by Alexis C. Glenn/UPI | License Photo

Rep. Diana DeGette, D-Colo., joined by fellow House Democrats, speaks at a press conference on the birth control mandate in the Affordable Care Act in 2014. DeGette has served in the House since 1997. File Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI | License Photo

Rep. Rosa DeLauro, D-Conn., speaks at a rally in opposition to the Republican tax plan last year. DeLauro has served in the House since 1991. File Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI | License Photo

Rep. Kathy Castor, D-Fla., and other Democrats on the House Energy and Commerce Committee hold a news conference calling for the firing or resignation of Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt in April. Pruitt resigned in July. Castor has served in the House since 2007. File Photo by Ken Cedeno/UPI | License Photo

Rep. Lois Frankel, D-Fla., stands with her son Ben Lubin as she celebrates her win in 2012. Frankel has served in the House since 2013. File Photo by Gary I Rothstein/UPI | License Photo

Rep. Frederica Wilson, D-Fla., speaks during a ceremony to rename the House Democratic Cloakroom in honor of former Rep. Gabrielle Giffords and the late Rep. Leo J. Ryan last year. Wilson has served in the House since 2011. Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI | License Photo

President George W. Bush awards the Presidential Medal of Freedom to former Health and Human Services Secretary Donna Shalala. The Florida Democrat will begin her first term in the House in January. File Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI | License Photo

Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, D-Hawaii, speaks during a ceremony with House and Senate leaders honoring Filipino veterans of World War II last year. Gabbard has served in the House since 2013. Photo by Erin Schaff/UPI | License Photo

Rep. Jan Schakowsky, D-Ill., listens to testimony during a House Budget Committee hearing. Schakowsky has served in the House since 1998. Photo by Erin Schaff/UPI | License Photo

Rep. Cheri Bustos (R), D-Ill., greets House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi’s granddaughter Madeline Prowda, after Democratic women of the House posed for a photo. Bustos has served in the House since 2013. File Photo by Ken Cedeno/UPI | License Photo

Chellie Pingree, shown in 2005 as president of Common Cause, talks to the media. The Maine Republican has served in the House since 2009. File Photo by Roger L. Wollenberg/UPI | License Photo

Rep. Brenda Lawrence, D-Mich., speaks along with other lawmakers, criticizing Donald Trump’s tweets insulting TV anchors. Lawrence has served in the House since 2015. File Photo by Molly Riley/UPI | License Photo

Rep. Betty McCollum, D-Minn., speaks during a news conference in favor of renewing a law banning assault rifles and high-capacity magazines in 2004. McCollum has served in the House since 2001. File Photo by Roger L. Wollenberg/UPI | License Photo

Rep. Ann Wagner, R- Mo., has served in the House since 2013. File Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI | License Photo

Rep. Nydia Velazquez, D-N.Y., speaks during a press conference about Donald Trump’s response to hurricane damage in Puerto Rico last year. Velazquez has served in the House since 1993 and was the first Puerto Rican woman elected to the chamber. File Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI | License Photo

Rep. Carolyn Maloney, D-N.Y. speaks during a news conference on the Debbie Smith Reauthorization Act of 2014, which would extend a federal grant program to reduce the backlog of DNA test kits of sexual assault victims through 2019. Maloney has served in the House since 1993. File Photo by Molly Riley/UPI | License Photo

Rep. Nita Lowey, D- N.Y., speaks at the 2016 Democratic National Convention. Lowey has served in the House since 1989. File Photo by Pat Benic/UPI | License Photo

Rep. Virginia Foxx, R-N.C., speaks during the Road to Majority 2016 Conference. Foxx has served in the House since 2005. File Photo by Leigh Vogel/UPI | License Photo

Rep. Marcy Kaptur, D-Ohio, holds up a copy of “The Toyota Way” during a House Oversight and Government Reform Committee hearing on problems with the vehicles in 2010. Kaptur has served in the House since 1983. File Photo by Alexis C. Glenn/UPI | License Photo

Rep. Marcia Fudge, D-Ohio, permanent chairwoman of the Democratic National Convention, opens day two of the event in 2016. Fudge has served in the House since 2008. Photo by Pat Benic/UPI | License Photo

At the State of the Union address in January, Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee, D-Texas, wears a red button in honor of Recy Taylor, who was raped while walking home from work in Alabama in 1944. Lee has served in the House since 1995. File Photo by Erin Schaff/UPI | License Photo

Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers, R-Wash., speaks during a press conference on budget and tax bills in 2016. McMorris has served in the House since 2005. File Photo by Erin Schaff/UPI | License Photo

Rep. Gwen Moore speaks at the Democratic National Convention in 2016. Moore has served in the House since 2005. File Photo by Ray Stubblebine/UPI | License Photo

Rep. Eleanor Holmes Norton, D-Washington, D.C., speaks at a news conference. Holmes has served as a delegate to the House since 1991. File Photo by Erin Schaff/UPI | License Photo

Rep. Amata Coleman Radewagen, R-American Samoa, is a non-voting delegate who has served in the House since 2015. Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Resident Commissioner Jenniffer González, R-Puerto Rico, is a non-voting member in Congress who has served since 2017. Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Delegate to United States House of Representatives Stacey Plaskett, D-United States Virgin Islands, is a non-voting member who has served in Congress since 2015. Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Rep. Liz Cheney, R-Wyo., speaks to the media after being elected Republican conference chairwoman following the Republican leadership elections for the 116th Congress. Cheney, daughter of former Vice President Dick Cheney, has served in the House since 2017. Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI | License Photo

Rep. Debbie Lesko, R-Ariz. won the special election to replace Trent Franks, who resigned in February 2018, to represent Arizona in the House. Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Rep. Julia Brownley, D-Calif., has served in the House since 2013. Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Rep. Norma Torres, D-Calif., has served in the House since 2015. Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Rep. Nanette Barragán, D-Calif., has served in the House since 2017. Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Rep. Lisa Blunt Rochester, D-Del., has served in the House since 2017 and was the first woman and first person of color to represent Delaware in the Congress. Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Rep. Stephanie Murphy, D-Fla., has served in the House since 2017. Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Rep. Val Demings, D-Fla., has served in the House since 2017. Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Rep. Susan Brooks, R-Ind., has served in the House since 2013. Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Rep. Katherine Clark, D-Mass., has served in the House since 2013. Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Representative-elect Elissa Slotkin, D-Mich., will begin her first term in the House in January 2019. Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Rep. Debbie Dingell, D-Mich., has served in the House since 2015. Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Vicky Hartzler, R-Mo., has served in the House since 2011. Photo by Wikimedia Commons

Rep. Dina Titus, D-Nev., has served in the House since 2009. Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Rep. Annie Kuster, D-N.H., has served in the House since 2013. Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Rep. Bonnie Watson Coleman, D-N.J., has served in the House since 2015. Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Rep. Kathleen Rice, D-N.Y., has served in the House since 2015. Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Rep. Grace Meng, D-N.Y., has served in the House since 2013. Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Rep. Yvette Clarke, D-N.Y., has served in the House since 2007. Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Rep. Elise Stefanik, R-N.Y., has served in the House since 2015. She was the youngest woman ever elected to Congress at the time. Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Rep. Alma Adams, D-N.C., has served in the House since 2014. Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Rep. Suzanne Bonamici, D- Ore., has served in the House since 2012. Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Rep. Kay Granger, R-Texas, has served in the House since 1997. Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Rep. Suzan DelBene, D-Wash., has served in the House since 2012. Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler, R-Wash., has served in the House since 2011. Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Rep. Pramila Jayapal, D-Wash., has served in the House since 2017. Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Rep. Robin Kelly, D-Ill., has served in the House since 2013. Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Rep. Jackie Walorski, R-Ind., has served in the House since 2013. Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson, D-Texas, has served in the House since 1993. Johnson was the first registered nurse elected to Congress. Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

0 of 0