Cladding crisis: key workers are in the dark about a looming £85k bill as the government’s aid situation remains unclear.

0

Cladding crisis: key workers are in limbo over a looming £85k bill as the government aid situation remains unclear.

‘I have no idea how I’m going to pay the £85,000,’ she says.

I’m just sick; I can’t sleep, concentrate, and I’m at a loss for what to do.’

As confusion over financing for cladding repairs continues to cause despair among leaseholders, the owner of a London flat claims she has been unfairly charged an £85,000 repair bill for the outside of her block.

Beth Pritchard, an accountant, owns a two-bedroom flat in Southwark.

She claims the freeholder informed residents late last month that urgent repairs to the external wall system and the removal of timber balconies would begin in November.

The total bill is expected to be £2.6 million, with up to 30 flats in the building, implying that each owner could be charged an average of £85,000.

“It amazes me that our freeholder can send us an £85,000 bill for work that is scheduled to begin next month.”

“No details of a payment plan have been given to us,” Ms Pritchard, 40, says.

“I rent out my spare room, and my roommate just informed me that she is leaving because she does not want to live in a flat where major renovations are taking place.”

So, on top of having to conjure up £85,000 out of thin air, I’ll be behind on my current mortgage.”

Ms Pritchard is one of thousands of leaseholders who have been affected by the cladding scandal that has erupted in the aftermath of the June 2017 disaster at Grenfell Tower in North Kensington, west London, where flammable cladding on the block was found to have aided the spread of a fire that killed 72 people.

Since then, freeholders of high-rise buildings have been required to remove any unsafe cladding and perform “remediation work” in order to prevent fires.

According to a report by the House of Commons, the estimated total cost of work for affected blocks is around £15 billion.

So far, the government has provided £5.1 billion in funding, leaving many homeowners to make up the difference.

There have been numerous instances of flat owners facing massive repair bills or being unable to sell their property.

Many mortgage lenders now require a seller to provide an EWS1 certificate proving the building’s exterior is free of combustible materials.

These certificates are costly to produce and in short supply.

UK news summary from Infosurhoy.

Cladding crisis: key workers are in the dark about an looming £85k bill as the government’s aid situation remains unclear.

wpcc-script async src=”https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js” charset=”utf-8″]

Cladding crisis: key workers left in limbo over looming £85k bill as confusion over Government aid continues

Read More - Featured Image

Cladding crisis: key workers left in limbo over looming £85k bill as confusion over Government aid continues

Read More - Featured Image

Comments are closed.