Tate Britain’s Hogarth and Europe exhibition is full of treasures, but it treats visitors like idiots.

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Tate Britain’s Hogarth and Europe exhibition is full of treasures, but it treats visitors like idiots.

According to Hettie Judah, the gallery’s new exhibition is curatorially confused, with wall texts that assume viewers can’t think for themselves.

Trump, William Hogarth’s pug, is one of my favorites.

Hogarth creates a picture within a picture in his self-portrait of 1745.

In his bohemian cloth cap, he appears relaxed rather than grand.

Hogarth’s portrait’s oval frame is supported by books by Shakespeare, Swift, and Milton.

A palette next to it shows the serpentine curve he dubbed the ‘line of beauty.’

These objects imply Hogarth’s place in the tradition of storytelling and satire, as well as his own aesthetics theory.

Meanwhile, Trump sits in the foreground of the painting, his tongue lolling and his grizzled face painted with a hangdog expression.

He takes on the role of the old dog, Hogarth’s alter ego, observing human folly and misadventure from the ground up.

Trump the pug serves as a reminder that Hogarth’s paintings are never straightforward.

A dog isn’t just a dog, and a glass isn’t just a glass.

Hogarth is a painter of bodies and action, depicting people and objects colliding, reacting to one another, and setting off a chain of events.

These are lively pieces that take your gaze on a bouncing path.

The paintings on the wall, the pots on the fireplace, the servants and musicians all add to the drama by commenting on what is happening in the center.

The periphery is where Hogarth found himself as a satirist and observer of city life.

He places us there on occasion as well.

We peer out from within an archway into a daylit street scene before the Calais gate in O the Roast Beef of Old England (1748).

A portly friar inspects a side of beef with a thick layer of fat while ragged and scrawny French soldiers sup thin broth.

Pious old women extol the virtues of fresh fish, while a scruffy Scotsman sits on the stone floor beneath the arch’s protection.

The artist can be seen with his sketchbook to the left, just as a hand reaches out to apprehend him.

In Calais, Hogarth was accused of espionage.

In a formal sense, he wasn’t a spy.

He was, however, a sly observer of people who was ruthless in exposing their flaws.

Avarice, avarice, avarice, avarice, avarice, avarice, avarice, avarice, avarice,

UK news summary from Infosurhoy.

Tate Britain’s Hogarth and Europe exhibition is full of treasures, but it treats visitors like idiots.

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Hogarth and Europe, Tate Britain, review: Filled with treasures – it’s a shame it treats visitors like idiots

Hogarth & Europe Tate Britain William Hogarth Miss Mary Edwards, 1742 The Frick Collection, New York, photo: Joe Coscia Jr. Image from https://www.tate.org.uk/press/press-releases/hogarth-europe-1 The attached images are on loan to you, and are accepted by you under the following terms and conditions: ? That the reproductions are accompanied by the name of the artist, title, date, owner and copyright line; ? That the reproductions are not cropped, overprinted, tinted or subject to any form of derogatory treatment without the prior approval of the copyright owner; ? That only low resolution (72 dpi maximum) and small size (600 x 600 pixels maximum) can be used online. ? That the images are only reproduced to illustrate an article or feature reviewing or reporting on Hogarth and Europe at Tate Britain (section 30 (i) and (ii) of the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988); ? That any reproductions that accompany an article are not used for marketing or advertising purposes; ? That images are not transferred to a third party or to a database. ? The use of images for front covers may attract a fee and will require the prior authorisation of the owner and copyright holder of the work. Please contact Tate Press Office for such use.Read More - Featured ImageHogarth & Europe Tate Britain William Hogarth Heads of Six of Hogarth?s Servants, c 1750-5 Tate Image from https://www.tate.org.uk/press/press-releases/hogarth-europe-1 The attached images are on loan to you, and are accepted by you under the following terms and conditions: ? That the reproductions are accompanied by the name of the artist, title, date, owner and copyright line; ? That the reproductions are not cropped, overprinted, tinted or subject to any form of derogatory treatment without the prior approval of the copyright owner; ? That only low resolution (72 dpi maximum) and small size (600 x 600 pixels maximum) can be used online. ? That the images are only reproduced to illustrate an article or feature reviewing or reporting on Hogarth and Europe at Tate Britain (section 30 (i) and (ii) of the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988); ? That any reproductions that accompany an article are not used for marketing or advertising purposes; ? That images are not transferred to a third party or to a database. ? The use of images for front covers may attract a fee and will require the prior authorisation of the owner and copyright holder of the work. Please contact Tate Press Office for such use.Read More - Featured ImageHogarth & Europe Tate Britain William Hogarth The Painter and his Pug, 1745 Tate Image from https://www.tate.org.uk/press/press-releases/hogarth-europe-1 The attached images are on loan to you, and are accepted by you under the following terms and conditions: ? That the reproductions are accompanied by the name of the artist, title, date, owner and copyright line; ? That the reproductions are not cropped, overprinted, tinted or subject to any form of derogatory treatment without the prior approval of the copyright owner; ? That only low resolution (72 dpi maximum) and small size (600 x 600 pixels maximum) can be used online. ? That the images are only reproduced to illustrate an article or feature reviewing or reporting on Hogarth and Europe at Tate Britain (section 30 (i) and (ii) of the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988); ? That any reproductions that accompany an article are not used for marketing or advertising purposes; ? That images are not transferred to a third party or to a database. ? The use of images for front covers may attract a fee and will require the prior authorisation of the owner and copyright holder of the work. Please contact Tate Press Office for such use.

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