‘Unseen, unheard, and unsupported,’ say NHS midwives who have become suicidal due to burnout as a result of a staffing shortage.

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In a staffing crisis, NHS midwives reveal how burnout has left them suicidal.

Several women speak out about their traumatic experiences and explain why support is so desperately needed ahead of the ‘March with Midwives’ protest on Sunday.

Rebecca* wakes up from a five-hour nap, picks up her two children from school, feeds them dinner, and heads off to start her 12-hour shift on an unpredictable, tumultuous ward with dread.

When she arrives at her hospital, she is frequently shuffled around different wards without warning to cover for midwives who are on call.

“You’re anxious even before you start,” Rebecca, who has worked at the job for 24 years, says.

“I’m never sure if I’m going to come or go.”

She has witnessed firsthand how a lack of staff poses a serious threat to patients, recalling how a woman who had recently given birth collapsed while in her care.

“I was ringing the emergency bell, but no one came because there was no staff,” she explains.

The woman recovered, but the incident remains a source of anxiety for her.

“I’m on long-term disability due to PTSD triggered by everything I saw and experienced at work,” she explains.

“No one cares what you think, feel, or have gone through.”

Rebecca was also summoned to an operating room to assist a mother suffering from abnormal contractions who was “in excruciating pain” while she was “trying to reassure her.”

“The anaesthetist was unable to control her pain, but the registrar and consultant continued to examine her despite her screams.”

None of this was done with permission, which is a serious infraction.

For the entire time, this woman screamed bloodcurdlingly.

I’m still experiencing flashbacks.

“I made an attempt on my life as a result of it all accumulating.”

They refused to accept responsibility for my desperation, despite the fact that it was a result of what I had seen and experienced.

It was all just too much for me, and I’m exhausted.”

According to a recent Royal College of Midwives survey, 60% of midwifery staff are considering leaving due to severe NHS understaffing and fears of being unable to provide safe care to mothers and babies.

“Attempts by the government to increase staffing numbers may increase supply, but.

UK news summary from Infosurhoy.

‘Unseen, unheard, and unsupported,’ say NHS midwives who have become suicidal due to burnout as a result of a staffing shortage.

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‘Unseen, unheard and unsupported’: NHS midwives reveal how burnout has left them suicidal in staffing crisis

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