Coronavirus vaccine researchers name date it will be available ‘at the earliest’ – Latest News

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The minister said the government was funding grants to three German biotech companies to help speed up the process.

Speaking at a press conference in Berlin, German Research Minister Anja Karliczek says it is unlikely a coronavirus vaccine will be made available to the wider public before the middle of 2021.

German Research Minister Anja Karliczek said people should not “expect a miracle” and suggested a coronavirus vaccine may not come as quickly as some people may think

Germany has seen a spike in cases recently

A coronavirus vaccine is also being developed at the University of Oxford

The findings on the Oxford vaccine trial were published in medical journal, The Lancet

A coronavirus vaccine may not be widely available to the public until the middle of 2021, German authorities have claimed.

Ms Karliczek said: “We should not expect a miracle.

CureVac, BioNTech and IDT Biologika, are all receiving funding from the German government, the minister said, but warned people should not expect a miracle.

“We must continue to assume that vaccines for the broader population will only be available from the middle of next year at the earliest.”

It has prompted warnings from Germany’s health agency, that has said the country is at risk of a second wave if it can’t isolate the spread.

The company has so far recorded more than 205,000 infections and over 9,000 deaths, but the country is experiencing a spike in cases.

She also urged people to continue observing social distancing rules, which are designed to stop the virus from spreading further.

A coronavirus vaccine is also being developed at the University of Oxford, with promising results in the first phase of testing.

Trials involving 1,077 people showed the injection allowed them to produce antibodies and white blood cells that can fight Covid-19.

Professor Sarah Gilbert, of the University of Oxford, said: “There is still much work to be done before we can confirm if our vaccine will help manage the Covid-19 pandemic, but these early results hold promise.

The findings on the Oxford vaccine trial were published in medical journal, The Lancet.

“If our vaccine is effective, it is a promising option as these types of vaccine can be manufactured at large scale.

“A successful vaccine against Sars-Cov-2 could be used to prevent infection, disease and death in the whole population, with high-risk populations such as hospital workers and older adults prioritised to receive vaccination.”

“As well as continuing to test our vaccine in phase-three trials, we need to learn more about the virus – for example, we still do not know how strong an immune response we need to provoke to effectively protect against Sars-Cov-2 infection.

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