The new ‘five full day’ isolation rules are explained, including why it’s LONGER than you think.

0

The new ‘five full days’ isolation rules are explained – and why they are LONGER than you think.

NEW Covid isolation rules will take effect on Monday, but you may need to stay inside for longer than you think.

People who test positive in England will be able to leave after five full days starting January 17.

To be released from isolation, they must test negative on lateral flow tests on days five and six.

However, the first full day of isolation does not have to be the day you test positive or notice symptoms, though you must still isolate if either of these events occurs.

According to the UK Health Security Agency, this is now known as “day zero,” with the following day counting as day one.

The following is an example of a timeline:

Monday Day 0 (when you first notice symptoms or have a positive test result)

Day One of Tuesday

Day 2 of Wednesday

3rd Thursday

Day 4 (Friday)

The first lateral flow test was performed on Saturday, Day 5.

Day 6 – do a second lateral flow test, and if both are negative, you can come out of isolation.

Isolation begins the day your first symptoms appear.

You must stay in isolation for a total of five days, with the exception of days five and six, when you can leave after experiencing negative lateral flows.

So, if you first noticed symptoms on Monday morning (day zero), you can take your first lateral flow test on Saturday (day five), regardless of when you tested positive.

After a second negative lateral flow test on Sunday morning, you could be out of isolation.

However, if you continue to test positive, you must remain in isolation until a negative test is obtained.

Isolation begins the day after you have your first positive lateral flow test.

You must stay in isolation for five days in total, with the exception of days five and six, when you can leave after experiencing negative lateral flows.

If you test positive on Monday morning at 11 a.m., which is day zero, you must wait until Saturday (day five) to test again to see if you are negative.

After a second negative lateral flow test on Sunday morning, you could be out of isolation.

However, if you continue to test positive, you must remain in isolation until a negative test is obtained.

In the United Kingdom, Omicron is now the most common strain, and most people who test positive for it have cold-like symptoms.

Anyone who tests positive on a lateral flow must now log their results and isolate, and they don’t need to have a PCR if they don’t have symptoms.

They must still take a PCR even if they have symptoms.

Latest News from Infosurhoy.

Comments are closed.