Barbados’ decision to sever imperial ties with the United Kingdom could reverberate throughout the Caribbean and beyond, causing Republican ripples.

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Barbados’ decision to sever imperial ties with the United Kingdom could reverberate throughout the Caribbean and beyond, causing Republican ripples.

Given its painful history as a key center in the slave trade, Barbados’ decision to become a republic is highly symbolic.

Nearly 400 years after the first English ship arrived on the Caribbean island, Barbados will finally sever its imperial ties with Britain next week.

It’s been 30 years since Mauritius, a former British colony, deposed the Queen as head of state.

The Indian Ocean island has chosen to remain a Commonwealth member.

Barbados has gone through the same thing.

Nonetheless, the Caribbean island’s bid for independence could be a sign of things to come for the remaining 15 former British colonies, whose ties to the United Kingdom are largely sustained by affection for a monarch nearing the end of her reign.

Prince Charles, the 73-year-old heir to the British throne, will travel to Barbados for ceremonies marking the removal of his 95-year-old mother, Queen Elizabeth II, as head of state.

Apart from the United Kingdom, Queen Elizabeth reigns over Antigua and Barbuda, Australia, Belize, Barbados, Canada, Grenada, Jamaica, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, St Kitts and Nevis, St Lucia, St Vincent and the Grenadines, Solomon Islands, The Bahamas, and Tuvalu.

Barbados’ decision to become a republic is highly symbolic, given the island’s harrowing history as a major slave-trading hub.

Between 1627 and 1833, 600,000 Africans were brought to the island and put to work on the sugar plantations, bringing in large sums of money for the English owners.

According to Richard Drayton, a professor of imperial and global history at Kings College, London, who lived in Barbados as a child, “Barbados under English colonial rule became the laboratory for plantation societies in the Caribbean.”

Professor Sir Hilary Beckles, a Barbadian historian, stated, “This is the end of the story of colonial exploitation of the mind and body.”

He described the event as “historic” for Barbados, the Caribbean, and all post-colonial societies.

However, not everyone is convinced of the breakaway – or the manner in which it was implemented.

Barbados’ largest newspaper, The Nation, questioned the government’s handling of the reform in an editorial, writing that “a referendum should not be off the table.”

Some critics of Mia Mottley, the charismatic Bajan prime minister, claim that her haste.

News summary from Infosurhoy in the United Kingdom.

Barbados’ decision to sever imperial ties with the United Kingdom could reverberate across the Caribbean – and beyond.

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Barbados cutting imperial links with the UK may send Republican ripples across the Caribbean – and beyond

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