Brexit LIVE: Boris to put deal to Parliament in DAYS after crushing Remainers in election

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BORIS JOHNSON is planning to bring back his Brexit deal to Parliament next week as he wastes no time in acting on his promise to “get Brexit done” following his election success.

The Prime Minister’s deal could be put before MPs at first reading as early as Friday. This will follow the Queen’s speech on Thursday and will leave 15 or 16 scheduled sitting days before the end of the January deadline. This is because Theresa May’s former legislative director, Nikki da Costa, said it could take five weeks to get Withdrawal Agreement Bill through the Commons.

Other EU leaders also kept a close eye on the election as the Prime Minister secured an 80-seat majority.

French President Emmanuel Macron said there was a “very special relationship” on offer for the UK after Brexit through a trade deal with the EU.

He said in a press conference: “I want to tell our British friends and allies… you are not leaving Europe.

“If Boris Johnson wants a very ambitious trade deal, there has to be very ambitious regulatory convergence.

“We do not want them to be an unfair competitor.

“My message to the UK is that the more loyal we are vis-a-vis each other, the closer relationship we can have. If the British prime minister and the

British parliament want an ambitious trade deal, they know where the European standards are.”

Furious clashes between Remainers and Brexiteers broke out in London after hundreds of left-wing demonstrators marched on Downing Street and across central London chanting “not my Prime Minister” in anger at the Parliamentary majority secured by Mr Johnson. 

The protestors, who brandished signs that read “Defy Tory Rule”, “no to Boris Johnson” and “Refugees Welcome” sparked a backlash on social media.

One Twitter user slammed the protesters for being “leftist thugs demonstrating their inability to understand or accept British democracy”.

Another user said: “Ffs..there’s a protest in London about the election result.

“We lost. They won.”

A third said: “Utter cretins. You have the right to protest.

“But not the right to stampede into London, disrupt everyone, be unruly and vile, if you do, you can f***ing do one.

“I just can’t stand their level of sanctimonious arrogance.

“They lost, so they change to balaclavas and smoke and aggression because they think they’re right and perfect etc.”

This huge win for Mr Johnson has “settled the issue of Brexit” for both the EU and the UK, according to political commentator Michael Portillo.

The Conservatives won a huge majority in Thursday’s general election, winning 364 seats with just one left to declare while Labour trailed behind with just 203.

However, the triumph could also lead to a surprise U-turn for the Prime Minister in his Brexit promise.

Lord Portillo told LBC’s Nick Ferrari that Boris Johnson could controversially “accept laws made in Brussels” in order to strike a trade deal with the EU.

He said: “There is not going to be a second referendum, there is going to be Brexit.

“But it also settles it for the EU. Any hope they had, like Donald Tusk, that we could change our mind, that is gone now.”

Mr Corbyn announced he would not lead Labour into another General Election following the party’s disastrous defeat – but who do you think should replace him?

Express.co.uk readers can vote in our poll on who should be the next Labour leader.

Names tipped to replace Mr Corbyn include shadow Brexit secretary Sir Keir Starmer, shadow business secretary Rebecca Long-Bailey and Birmingham Yardley MP Jess Phillips.

Sir Keir is the favourite with Ladbrokes at 5/2.

Ms Long-Bailey is 4/1, while Ms Phillips is 6/1.

Shadow education secretary Angela Rayner is also 6/1.

Other frontrunners include Lisa Nandy and Yvette Cooper at 8/1.

Whitehall could could be revamped after the UK leaves the EU in January in a series of radical reforms.

The Department for Exiting the European Union could be folded into Department for Trade and the Department for International Development could be turned into the Foreign Office.

Mr Johnson is also expected to announce a new-look team next week that could start as soon as Monday.

There will be impressive election campaign performers who he will be looking to promote and others who bungled and may be demoted as a result.

Mr Johnson will replace Nicky Morgan, who stepped down as an MP at the election as culture secretary.

He will also find a new environment minister after Zac Goldsmith, who lost his seat in Richmond Park.

Commons Leader Jacob Rees-Mogg, who sparked controversy with his insensitive comments about the Grenfell Tower fire at the start of the campaign, may be on his way out.

Former Deputy Prime Minister Lord Michael Heseltine spoke to Sky News following the election, calling on Remainers to “face up” to the fact they had lost.

The Tory peer came under fire earlier in the campaign for his shocking plea to voters to back the Liberal Democrats in order to stop Boris Johnson’s Brexit.

However, with a “thumping” Conservative majority win, Lord Heseltine was forced to admit the public didn’t “listen to him”.

He told Sky: “You have to be modest about the role you play in life.

“They didn’t listen because they wanted to get out of the austerity and they saw Brexit as a route to do that.

“I think it’s much more complicated than that.

“We’ve lost, we have to face up to that, we’re going to leave Europe.”

German Chancellor Angela Merkel told the EU summit news conference on Friday: “It will be very complicated.

“It’s about an array of relations, in trade, in fishing and cooperation in security and foreign policy.

“Our biggest hurdle will be that we need to sort out these issues very quickly.”

French President Emmanuel Macron warned Britain that the more it chose to deregulate its economy after Brexit, the more it would lose access to the EU’s single market.

He said in a press conference: “I want to tell our British friends and allies… you are not leaving Europe.

“We do not want them to be an unfair competitor.

“My message to the UK is that the more loyal we are vis-a-vis each other, the closer relationship we can have. If the British prime minister and the British parliament want an ambitious trade deal, they know where the European standards are.”

The EU is hoping to start trade talks with Britain by March, leaving just 10 months to strike a deal and get it approved by London and the EU, including member states’ parliaments.

Brexit Party leader Nigel Farage has vowed to be “not too far away from the action” after Boris Johnson led the Conservatives to victory at the polls.

The Tories will hold an 80-seat majority when Parliament resumes and Mr Johnson said his party’s MPs have an “overwhelming mandate… to get Brexit done and we will honour that mandate by 31 January”.

But Mr Farage, whose party contested 275 seats and took 2% of votes but won no seats, wrote in The Daily Telegraph that pressure would have to be reapplied if Mr Johnson does not live up to his promise of getting Brexit done.

He added he was now concerned with the form of Britain’s departure from the bloc, rather than whether Brexit would take place at all.

He wrote: “The truth is that the threat from the Brexit Party, together with the influence of the European Research Group in parliament, has disappeared for the time being.

“Questions over the future shape of Brexit and Britain’s place in the world are now entirely in the hands of Johnson.

“With half of his Cabinet having voted Remain, and substantial global pressures on him, it will be tempting for him to pursue the easy option of a soft Brexit.”

Former Deputy Prime Minister Lord Michael Heseltine spoke to Sky News following the election, calling on Remainers to “face up” to the fact they had lost.

The Tory peer came under fire earlier in the campaign for his shocking plea to voters to back the Liberal Democrats in order to stop Boris Johnson’s Brexit.

However, with a “thumping” Conservative majority win, Lord Heseltine was forced to admit the public didn’t “listen to him”.

He told Sky: “You have to be modest about the role you play in life.

“They didn’t listen because they wanted to get out of the austerity and they saw Brexit as a route to do that.

“I think it’s much more complicated than that.

“We’ve lost, we have to face up to that, we’re going to leave Europe.”

The Prime Minister, who has just won a landslide general election, has promised the country to “get Brexit done” by January 31.

By this he means pass his Withdrawal Agreement through the House of Commons – but if and when it is passed, a transition period will start, during which he must negotiate the future trading relationship between the UK and the EU.

This is likely to present numerous obstacles and plenty of uncertainty about the UK’s future.

His current timetable for this would have negotiations concluded and the UK to be completely severed from the EU by December 2020.

However, 11 months is considered a very short time for such a complex negotiations and some EU leaders hoping he will be willing to bend on this commitment.

Anand Menon, the director of The UK in a Changing Europe, told Express.co.uk: “I think some EU states are probably hoping that Boris Johnson isn’t true to his word and actually extends the transition as well because that suits them.

“This is partly because they’re still getting money and partly because they get longer without any disruption to trade.”

The Prime Minister will use his thumping electoral mandate to deliver a Brexit which will turn Britain into an economic power which will outstrip Germany, Tory MP Daniel Kawczynski has said.

Mr Kawczynski was re-elected as MP for Shrewsbury and Atcham with an increased majority of 11,217, taking 52.5 percent of the vote.

He told Express.co.uk there could be no doubt about the verdict nationally, with Mr Johnson’s Conservative Party taking 365 seats compared with just 203 won by Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour Party, giving the Tories a majority of 80. 

He added: “I am delighted the people of Great Britain have spoken so emphatically to get Brexit delivered and build a strong economy built on sustainable debt provision rather than Venezuela-esque hyper-borrowing under Corbyn.”

The Irish premier has shared his “relief” over this week’s election results.

He said the results boded well for those who supported the Withdrawal Agreement.

He also congratulated Mr Johnson for “an enormous victory for him on a personal level and a very clear result for his party”.

He said: “It’s a positive thing that we have a decisive outcome in Britain in their elections. We had for a few years a parliament that wasn’t able to form a majority around anything.

“I’m relieved, I’m relieved for my country and I’m also relieved for the UK. We’ve really had deadlock and gridlock for years now, now that’s going to pass.

“Now we have a majority in the House of Commons to ratify the Withdrawal Agreement, and next steps will be to ratify that agreement which guarantees no hard border between north and south, the protection of the Common Travel Area and British and Irish citizens’ rights will be protected.”

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