Channel 4’s Stath Lets Flats is a no-frills revival of the forgotten art of screwball comedy.

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Channel 4’s Stath Lets Flats is a no-frills revival of the forgotten art of screwball comedy.

Carole’s toxic sister, Julia Davies, makes an appearance as the girls of Michael and Eagle enjoy a fancy night out.

Screwball comedy has become something of a lost art form, but in the third season of the Bafta-winning Stath Lets Flats, it is brought gloriously up to date.

This riotous sitcom about a Greek-Cypriot lettings agent (also the writer, Jamie Demetriou) navigating life in north London has carved out a niche as an anti-Fleabag.

It’s not in the least bit witty or arch, and it has nothing to do with millennial angst or gender dynamics in the twenty-first century.

Instead, it’s anarchic, nonsensical, and consistently funny.

Dumb and Dumber and the school of 90s chucklefests that prioritized rapid-fire gags over character development came to mind as a comedy comparison.

Stath (Demetriou) was out with his coworkers Al (Alistair Roberts) and Dean (Kiell Smith-Bynoe) on a lads’ night out.

He appeared to be unsure of what a lads’ night out entailed, though.

He assumed the three of them would split the one pint, so when it came time to toast, he doused the bartender in beer.

Later, he was astounded by Dean’s method of sharing crisps by opening the bag all the way down the side (“is that your crisp catcher?”).

Meanwhile, Katia (Ellie White), Stath’s ex-girlfriend, was rubbing her ex’s nose in it by going out with her female friends.

She, too, was as hapless as Stath, bringing his naive sister Sophie (Demetriou’s real-life sister, Natasia) along for a trip to a wine bar (apparently Carol Vorderman was a regular).

Carole (Katy Wix) and Kris (Julia Davis), two toxic sisters, accompanied them and spent the evening spewing cruel insults.

Everyone bumbled along like grown-up toddlers who had never been allowed outside without adult supervision before.

“It’s two bits of water in your head,” Stath said at one point during his monologue about how strange people’s eyes are.

Despite the absurdity, the comedy was unpretentious and free of frills for 30 minutes.

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Channel 4’s Stath Lets Flats is a no-frills revival of the forgotten art of screwball comedy.

Stath Lets Flats, Channel 4, review: A frill-free revival of the forgotten art of screwball comedy

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