‘Confusing Covid vaccine advice let pregnant women down – these tragedies should never have happened.’

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‘Confusing Covid vaccine advice let pregnant women down – these tragedies should never have happened.’

‘The government, the NHS, and society failed pregnant women,’ says the BMA’s chief officer, who was pregnant during the pandemic.

She claims that vaccine apprehension among pregnant women is due to mixed and confusing messaging, not to their fault.

Pregnant women who are hesitant to get the Covid-19 vaccine should not be blamed or chastised, according to a leading doctor, because they were “let down” by confusing and mixed messages that urgently need to be rectified.

According to shocking statistics, almost all expectant mothers admitted to hospitals with coronavirus (98%) have not received the vaccine.

Between February and November of this year, 1,714 pregnant women with Covid-19 were admitted to hospitals.

There were 1,681 people who had not been vaccinated, accounting for 98 percent of the total.

Furthermore, recent intensive care research has revealed that nearly 20% of the most critically ill Covid patients are pregnant women who have not been vaccinated.

Some of these “preventable admissions” resulted in the death of pregnant women or their children.

I revealed last night that the Royal College of Midwives and the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists were pushing for jabs to be made available at all antenatal clinics and pregnancy scans.

And just a few weeks ago, I told you about how baby Ivy-Rose Court died at the age of nine days after her mother contracted coronavirus during her pregnancy.

A few days after birth, the baby, who was 14 weeks early, tested positive for Covid-19.

She was one of the virus’s youngest victims.

Katie Leeming, 22, of Kirkham, near Blackpool, told me she decided not to get the Covid vaccine after speaking with other pregnant women and believing there wasn’t enough research into the vaccines’ effects during pregnancy.

Saiqa Parveen, 37, of Birmingham, died on November 1st in intensive care after contracting Covid while pregnant with her fifth child and never getting to hold her newborn daughter, who was born by emergency Caesarean section.

Her family explained that she was offered the vaccine but declined because she was pregnant.

Dr. Latifa Patel, a senior paediatric registrar and chief officer of the British Medical Association, is based in the north of England.

News summary from Infosurhoy in the United Kingdom.

‘Confusing Covid vaccine advice let down pregnant women – these tragedies should never have happened.’

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‘Pregnant women were let down by confusing Covid vaccine advice – these tragedies should never have happened’

An NHS spokesperson told i: “The NHS has advised midwifery staff to give pregnant women the information they need to make the right decision for them and their baby so if you are pregnant and have any concerns, please come forward and discuss them with a healthcare professional.

“Pregnant women can come forward at any time for the lifesaving Covid vaccine – they can make a booking through the national booking service online or by calling 119 anytime between 7am and 11pm seven days a week.”

A government spokesperson said: “We are doing everything we can to advise pregnant women that the Covid-19 vaccines are safe and it is vital all those eligible come forward as the jab is the best possible way they can protect themselves and their babies.

“We follow the expert advice of the independent JCVI, who updated their advice on the vaccination of pregnant women earlier this year following emerging robust safety data from the US.

“We continue to work closely with expert clinicians and stakeholders on providing advice and information at every possible opportunity to support these women in getting the jab.”

Katie Leeming, 22, with her baby Ivy-Rose. Both mum and baby tested positive or Covid-19 and Ivy-Rose died aged just nine-days-old. Provided to writer Aasma Day Aasma.Day@inews.co.ukDr Latifa Patel, a senior paediatric registrar based in the North of England and a chief officer at the British Medical Association (Photo: British Medical Association)Pregnant women who are hesitant about taking up the Covid-19 vaccine should not be blamed or criticised as they were ?let down? by confusing and mixed messages which urgently need rectifying, a leading medic has revealed (Photo: Getty Images)Dr Latifa Patel, a senior paediatric registrar based in the North of England and a chief officer at the British Medical Association (Photo: British Medical Association)

‘Pregnant women were let down by confusing Covid vaccine advice – these tragedies should never have happened’

An NHS spokesperson told i: “The NHS has advised midwifery staff to give pregnant women the information they need to make the right decision for them and their baby so if you are pregnant and have any concerns, please come forward and discuss them with a healthcare professional.

“Pregnant women can come forward at any time for the lifesaving Covid vaccine – they can make a booking through the national booking service online or by calling 119 anytime between 7am and 11pm seven days a week.”

A government spokesperson said: “We are doing everything we can to advise pregnant women that the Covid-19 vaccines are safe and it is vital all those eligible come forward as the jab is the best possible way they can protect themselves and their babies.

“We follow the expert advice of the independent JCVI, who updated their advice on the vaccination of pregnant women earlier this year following emerging robust safety data from the US.

“We continue to work closely with expert clinicians and stakeholders on providing advice and information at every possible opportunity to support these women in getting the jab.”

Katie Leeming, 22, with her baby Ivy-Rose. Both mum and baby tested positive or Covid-19 and Ivy-Rose died aged just nine-days-old. Provided to writer Aasma Day Aasma.Day@inews.co.ukDr Latifa Patel, a senior paediatric registrar based in the North of England and a chief officer at the British Medical Association (Photo: British Medical Association)Pregnant women who are hesitant about taking up the Covid-19 vaccine should not be blamed or criticised as they were ?let down? by confusing and mixed messages which urgently need rectifying, a leading medic has revealed (Photo: Getty Images)Dr Latifa Patel, a senior paediatric registrar based in the North of England and a chief officer at the British Medical Association (Photo: British Medical Association)

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