Daffodil Day is happening today – and is once again taking donations online

0

The charity is asking people to donate online, spread awareness and show solidarity with people affected by cancer.

You can donate to the Irish Cancer Society via its website here.

THE IRISH CANCER Society’s annual fundraising campaign to raise donations is happening online today for the second time during the pandemic.

Daffodil Day is aiming to raise funding through online donations to put towards the Irish Cancer Society’s work with people affected by cancer.

The society is asking people to donate online, spread awareness and show solidarity as it navigates running the day virtually.

Speaking to The Journal, acting CEO Conor King said that Daffodil Day is a “very community-based fundraising campaign”.

“There always was a digital element to it, but now to move it completely to digital has been very challenging, but I hope that people appreciate the work that has gone it by our supporters and volunteers right across the country,” King said.

“We have had to totally change the playbook,” he said.

“We’re a community of volunteers, of patients, of supporters and researchers right across the country. Our supporters in every community usually get out on the streets and support us – this year will be very different.”

King said the Irish Cancer Society has tried to replicate the “sense of community” that the day fosters while moving it to the online sphere.

Last year, Daffodil Day was due to take place on 26 March, two weeks after the first restrictions came into effect in Ireland.

“People ran marathons in their back garden, people hosted virtual coffee mornings, there were comedy shows through Zoom.”

The charity usually raises around €4 million from the annual campaign day.

However, its proceeds last year fell by half when it needed to suddenly shift online.

Although funding fell last year, the day was marked by creative efforts by supporters to keep the campaign alive.

“There was a huge energy at the start of the first lockdown and that’s difficult to replicate,” King said.

“There was a huge feel-good factor within the country, more of a feeling of solidarity during the first lockdown. Things are much more challenging now,” he said.

The charity started to plan for this year’s Daffodil Day last October.

“I think we were planning for the worst case scenario, which was a  lockdown, which has come to fruition,” King said.

#Open journalism

No news is bad news
Support The Journal

Your contributions will help us continue
to deliver the stories that are important to you

Support us now

“It was very clear that we wouldn’t be able to have any on-street supporters because of the public health guidance,” he said.

Instead, the charity is asking people to make donations through digital formats, such as on through website, texting, or Revolut.

“We’d love people to donate online and they’ll receive a digital Daffodil Day which they can spread across social media,” King said.

“It’s not just about donating, it’s also demonstrating solidarity and support with the cancer community,” he said.

“This year is a very tough year for everyone and the daffodil is a flower of hope; the first flower of spring after a dark, dark winter.

“I hope that this Daffodil Day can be a message and a symbol of hope for all those affected by cancer in a year that has been particularly hard for cancer patients.”

As part of the day’s events, the Laughter Lounge is hosting a comedy special and the Late Late Show is interviewing guests whose lives have been impacted by cancer.

Westlife’s Shane Filan, who lost his parents to cancer, is due to appear, as well as Jedward, who are shaving their hair to support the charity.

The Irish Cancer Society is accepting donations on its website. 

Daffodils in the National Botanic Gardens

Daffodils in the National Botanic Gardens

Share.

Leave A Reply