Despite tragedy, migrants say they are more determined than ever to cross the Channel.

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‘Get rich or die trying,’ migrants say, despite tragedy, they are more determined than ever to cross the Channel.

Over the last three years, the number of people crossing the English Channel in small boats has increased nearly 100-fold.

The tragedy off the coast of Calais yesterday, in which 27 people died after a small boat capsized, was the deadliest migrant Channel crossing in history.

It has, however, done little to dissuade people waiting in French migrant camps from hoping to make the same crossing in search of a better life in the United Kingdom.

When asked if he would still try to cross the Channel by small boat, Abdullah, a Sudanese migrant who said he had been traveling for four years, shrugged his shoulders slowly.

The 18-year-old said he paid €650 to a trafficker for a “package” of three attempted crossings, only one of which he completed.

“I heard about what happened, and it makes me afraid,” he said.

They were Sudanese, Somali, and Afghan people, just like me.

We all know it could happen to us, but look at us; we don’t have a lot of options, and the boats aren’t great.

They take in water, and the organizers overbooked the event.

“The first time I tried, the engine came to a halt, and the French police escorted us back.”

We were stopped on the beach for the second time.

I have one more opportunity.

I can’t afford to pay again, so it has to work this time.

I understand the danger; I dislike the sea, but this is my only way to get to England.

I want to go to school and improve my life.”

Roj and his wife Fatima were walking back toward the centre of Calais on the sand dunes of Sangatte, a short distance away.

The Iraqi couple, who claimed they were fleeing the Islamic State, would not say if they attempted to board a boat from the beach.

“What are we doing here?” Roj said. “We want to get to England, but there are only a few ways to get there.”

We make a payment and then wait.

It’s freezing outside, and the sea is choppy.

But we’ll get there eventually.

“We are unyielding.”

Amman, a 22-year-old Eritrean with a gangly, cheeky demeanor, had heard about the boat tragedy in the English Channel on Wednesday but refused to comment.

UK news summary from Infosurhoy

‘Get rich or die trying,’ migrants say, despite tragedy, they are more determined than ever to cross the Channel.

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‘Get rich or die trying’: Migrants say they are more determined than ever to cross Channel despite tragedy

Migrants at one of the camps in Calais said they would still try to cross the Channel despite yesterday’s incident (Photo: Cahal Milmo)Read More - Featured ImageGeresgiher, from Eritrea, was among refugees camped out in Calais on Thursday that said they were undeterred by yesterday’s tragedy (Photo: Leo Cendrowicz)DUNKIRK, FRANCE - NOVEMBER 25: Refugees walk through the new Jungle with their bags and belongings on November 25, 2021 in Dunkirk, France. At least 27 people including five women and a young girl died yesterday trying to cross the Channel to the UK in an inflatable dinghy in an incident which the International Organisation for Migration described as the biggest single loss of life in the Channel since it began collecting data in 2014. There are currently 1800 migrants and refugees currently living in Northern France. (Photo by Kiran Ridley/Getty Images)The deflated dinghy that capsized yesterday, killing 27 migrants onboard (Photo: Sky News)Read More - Featured Image

‘Get rich or die trying’: Migrants say they are more determined than ever to cross Channel despite tragedy

Migrants at one of the camps in Calais said they would still try to cross the Channel despite yesterday’s incident (Photo: Cahal Milmo)Read More - Featured ImageGeresgiher, from Eritrea, was among refugees camped out in Calais on Thursday that said they were undeterred by yesterday’s tragedy (Photo: Leo Cendrowicz)DUNKIRK, FRANCE - NOVEMBER 25: Refugees walk through the new Jungle with their bags and belongings on November 25, 2021 in Dunkirk, France. At least 27 people including five women and a young girl died yesterday trying to cross the Channel to the UK in an inflatable dinghy in an incident which the International Organisation for Migration described as the biggest single loss of life in the Channel since it began collecting data in 2014. There are currently 1800 migrants and refugees currently living in Northern France. (Photo by Kiran Ridley/Getty Images)The deflated dinghy that capsized yesterday, killing 27 migrants onboard (Photo: Sky News)Read More - Featured Image

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