Strawberry Moon 2019: NASA welcomes incredible June Full Moon – ‘sweetest Moon’ of year

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THE upcoming Strawberry Moon is the sweetest Full Moon of the year, according to US space agency NASA. Here is everything you need to know about the June Full Moon.

The next Full Moon of the year is the tasty-sounding Strawberry Moon or Rose Moon. Named in response to the changing seasons around this time of the year, the Strawberry Moon is the sixth of this year 12 Full Moon phases. The Moon will peak in brightness next week on Monday, June 12, in the morning hours when viewed from the UK. When this happens, NASA said the Moon will position itself opposite the Moon, fully illuminating its Earth-facing side.

NASA said: “The next Full Moon will be on Monday morning, June 17, 2019, appearing ‘opposite’ the Sun – in Earth-based longitude– at 4.31am EDT.

“The Moon will appear full for about three days around this time, from Saturday night through Tuesday morning.”

Here in the UK, the Full Moon’s morning peak will not be visible.

Instead, hopeful astronomers will have to wait until later when the Moon slowly creeps over the horizon at 9.30am BST, when viewed from London.

Once this happens, the Moon will light up the nights skies with its 100 percent illuminated face.

But what about the Moon’s incredibly unusual name? Where does the Strawberry Moon name come from?

According to NASA, the lunar monicker originates in the traditions of Native American tribes adopted by colonial Europeans.

NASA explained: “The Maine Farmer’s Almanac first published Indian names for the full Moons in the 1930s.

“According to this almanac, the Full Moon in June or the last Full Moon of Spring is known as the Strawberry Moon, a name universal to just about every Algonquin tribe.

“The name comes from the relatively short season for harvesting strawberries in northeastern North America.”

But this is not the only nickname used today and old European traditions have their own unique twists.

For instance, the June Full Moon is sometimes known as the Mead Moon or the Honey Moon.

And according to NASA, newlyweds racing off for their honeymoons can thank the Full Moon.

The space agency said: “The tradition of calling the first month of marriage the ‘honeymoon’ dates back to at least the 1500s and may be tied to this full Moon, either because of the custom of marrying in June or because the ‘Honey Moon’ is the ‘sweetest’ Moon of the year.

“Some writings suggest that the time around the Summer solstice at the end of June was when honey was ripe and ready to be harvested from hives or from the wild, which made this the ‘sweetest’ Moon.”

After the June Full Moon passes, the next Full Moon will be the July Buck Moon.

The next Full Moon will be on Monday morning

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