The number of students enrolled in humanities courses at universities has decreased by 40,000 in ten years.

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Humanities courses at universities have decreased by 40,000 students in the last ten years.

After the government encourages students to take up STEM courses, experts call for a revamp of A-levels and a ‘broadening’ of post-16 education to stem the decline.

According to research, far fewer people are studying humanities at university than they were a decade ago.

According to the Higher Education Policy Institute (HEPI), the total number of humanities students at UK universities has decreased by about 40,000 in ten years.

Ancient and modern languages, Classics, English, history, history of art, music, philosophy, and religious studies are all examples of humanities subjects.

The report suggests an overhaul of A-levels and a “broadening of post-16 education” to save the subects.

According to HEPI, the number of humanities students at British universities decreased by 42,380 students, or 18%, from 234,380 in 2009-10 to 192,000 in 2019-20.

According to the HEPI report, such subjects in UK universities have seen a significant long-term decline in relative size.

Between 1961-1962 and 2019-20, the percentage of students enrolled in humanities courses decreased from around 28% to around 8%.

The decline is mirrored at the school level, with a drop in A-level entries in almost all humanities subjects since 2016, which is larger than the drop in the 18-year-old population over the same period.

More people have been encouraged to study science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) subjects at university in recent years by the government.

Then-education secretary Gavin Williamson wrote in a blog post in May that an increase in the number of people studying Stem at university showed students were “starting to pivot away from dead-end courses that leave young people with nothing but debt.”

The causes of the decline are “complex,” according to the HEPI report, but students tend to choose subjects based on their enjoyment of them and their perceptions of their career prospects.

While employment prospects for humanities graduates are “weaker” than for graduates of other fields such as economics, engineering, medicine, and physics, the overall picture is “mixed,” according to the report.

“Humanities graduates are just as likely to be employed as graduates in other fields, and when subjects are ordered by average salaries of graduates five years after graduation, humanities subjects fall in the middle of the range,” the report says.

News summary from Infosurhoy in the United Kingdom.

The number of students enrolled in humanities courses at universities has decreased by 40,000 in ten years.

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University courses: number of students taking humanities subjects is down 40,000 in 10 years

University courses: number of students taking humanities subjects is down 40,000 in 10 years

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