Three people who changed careers to go back to school, from Arctic oil exploration to teaching.

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Three people who switched careers to return to school, from Arctic oil exploration to teaching

Since the Covid pandemic, there has been a surge in interest in changing careers to teaching.

A glamorous Milan catwalk show, a Hollywood film studio, and an arctic ship.

They are places that, at first glance, appear to be a world away from a rowdy Year 8 class on a drizzly Monday morning.

People, on the other hand, are abandoning these jobs in favor of becoming teachers.

They’re part of a growing trend of people deciding to return to school after a career change.

Now Teach is one of the organizations that is assisting people in making the transition.

Since its inception in 2016, the charity has assisted over 500 teachers in making career changes.

Now Teach, which had previously only operated in London, the South East, the East of England, and the West Midlands, has recently been awarded a contract by the Department for Education that will allow it to expand throughout England.

The expansion means the charity “won’t have to turn anyone away ever again on the basis of where they come from,” according to co-founder Lucy Kellaway, who left a job as a Financial Times journalist to become a teacher.

According to her, the Covid-19 pandemic and its aftermath have sparked a surge in interest in teaching.

Now Teach experienced a 21% increase in applications in the first year of the pandemic.

“I think what happened was that people who thought their jobs were meaningless in the first place found that doing them entirely on Zoom made them lose their will to live,” Kellaway says.

Some parents “felt so strongly about homeschooling their own children” that they decided to teach full-time.

Career switchers, according to Now Teach, bring a variety of skills and perspectives to schools, and are especially well-positioned to help students with things like career advice.

Career changers, according to Kellaway, can help support education recovery and the government’s ‘leveling up’ agenda by going national and targeting schools in disadvantaged areas.

The fashion designer

For more than two decades, Sameera Asad Cooper worked in the fashion industry for major brands such as Paul Smith.

She began her career as a menswear tailor before moving on to manufacturing and product development, and she “loved” it.

UK news summary from Infosurhoy

Three people who changed careers to return to school, from Arctic oil exploration to teaching

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From Arctic oil exploration to teaching – three people who changed careers to go back to school

From Arctic oil exploration to teaching – three people who changed careers to go back to school

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