What Keir Starmer’s policy agenda at the Labour Party conference tells us about his chances of winning the next election

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What Keir Starmer’s policy agenda at the Labour Party conference tells us about his chances of winning the next election

From a crime crackdown to mental health hubs to a Green New Deal, the president’s keynote speech was full of promises.

Here are the specifics.

Sir Keir Starmer pledged that his party would “never go into an election under my leadership with a manifesto that is not a serious plan for government.”

But what does the Labour leader’s policy agenda, as laid out in his Brighton speech, tell us about the nature of that manifesto – and whether it can help him win the election?

Sir Keir’s four-word credo, “work, care, equality, security,” guided the 90-minute speech, which included policy pledges on crime, mental health, education, and the environment.

There were no fully costed plans to back up the speech, but with two and a half years to go before an election, this is not surprising.

Labour, on the other hand, has promised to be more fiscally conservative than in the past, with shadow Chancellor Rachel Reeves announcing a new Office for Value for Money earlier this week.

Labour would refocus the NHS’s priorities away from emergency care and toward prevention, saving money in the process by making people healthier and catching problems early.

The party would also develop a “plan” for social care, but few details were provided.

One eye-catching policy was to establish a mental health hub in every community, similar to a Sure Start for the mind, to address one of society’s most neglected issues.

With the government funding 8,500 more counsellors and therapists, everyone who needs it would get it in less than a month.

As they emerge from the difficult years of the pandemic, many voters, particularly the younger generation, are likely to be receptive to these ideas.

With funding for “the most ambitious school improvement plan in a generation,” Labour claims that every parent should be able to send their child to a great public school.

Before the age of ten, every child would have the opportunity to participate in competitive sports and learn to play an instrument.

A fourth pillar of education – digital skills – would be included in the new curriculum.

Teenagers would be required to complete work experience.

Traditional Labour voters, who may have become disaffected in the past, see education as a strong policy area.

News summary from Infosurhoy in the United Kingdom.

What Keir Starmer’s policy agenda at the Labour Party conference tells us about his chances of winning the next election

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What Keir Starmer’s policy agenda at Labour conference tells us about whether he can win the next election

What Keir Starmer’s policy agenda at Labour conference tells us about whether he can win the next election

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