NASA Will Pay Students to Fix ‘Lunar Dust’ Moon Problem; Guess How Much…

0

Moon is currently in danger. Earlier, NASA said that the Earth’s satellite experiences ‘rusting,’ which turns the Moon into a reddish balloon. But that is not the only issue here.

There’s another thing called ‘Lunar dust,’ which is made out of tiny particles that could stick to anything when you’re in the satellite. To solve its dirty issue, NASA conducted the 2021 Big Idea Challenge.

If you’re up for the challenge to clean the Moon and you’re a student in America, NASA has something to offer for you.

Scitech Daily recently reported about the latest program of the agency called the 2021 Big Idea Challenge. This is an annual program that targets to find exceptional students in all universities in the country, to solve a current problem or issue that NASA has been facing.

For this year’s turn, the Big Idea challenge focuses on the theme, “Dust Mitigation Technologies for Lunar Applications.”

According to the report, Lunar dust is a common problem for astronauts and equipment when arriving at Moon. As the name suggests, these tiny particles or dust are not good for any future travels to the satellite.

These particles pose a health threat to astronauts’ lungs, damage cameras, get inside equipment’s hardware, or even interfere with instrument readings.

Of course, this needs to be fixed immediately. Especially now, the Artemis program is set to happen in 2024, wherein the “first woman and the next man” will soon travel.

To get it solved, NASA seeks help to undergraduates or graduates in America to help them on these categories:

If you’re probably thinking of getting on board with NASA, you should know or have the things you should know. 

According to the Big Idea website, teams should be composed a minimum of one faculty advisor from a Space Grant Affiliated university and five students from that university. A maximum number of 25 members could join the program.

Competition judges will select between five and 10 teams to receive up to $180,000 each to build equipment or solution to their desired category.

All interested and eligible teams can file their attempt of participation until Sept. 25. 

“We’ve designed this challenge so that teams have minimal constraints to create genuine out-of-the-box solutions,” said Drew Hope, Game Changing Development program manager at NASA’s Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. “Dealing with lunar dust will require incredibly creative and innovative approaches and collaborating with the Artemis generation through the BIG Idea Challenge is a strategic effort to fuel that type of innovation.” 

ALSO READ: New Study Suggests The Earth Has More Than 1 Moon

This article is owned by Tech Times

Written by Jamie Pancho 

Share.

About Author

Leave A Reply