A Prank at a College Football Rivalry Game Went Horribly Wrong

0

A Prank at a College Football Rivalry Game Went Horribly Wrong

In college football, it’s rivalry season.

Some of the sport’s most heated rivalries will take place over the next few weeks.

The Army-Navy rivalry is unrivaled.

This week, a game-related prank involving the two military academies went horribly wrong.

According to the New York Times, a group of West Point cadets made a critical error in their prank on the Naval Academy.

The following is a quote from the Associated Press:

I made a mistake.

“The trust that was recently broken between our brothers and sisters in arms has disappointed the US Military Academy and the US Naval Academy.”

“Neither academy’s core values of dignity and respect are reflected in these actions,” superintendents Lt.

Mr. Gen.

Vice Admiral Darryl A Williams

In a statement, Sean Buck said

The match between the Army and the Navy is scheduled for December.

the eleventh

A prank at a college football rivalry game went horribly wrong.

wpcc-script async src=”https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js” charset=”utf-8″]

wpcc-script async src=”//www.instagram.com/embed.js”]

A College Football Rivalry Game Prank Went Very Wrong

A College Football Rivalry Game Prank Went Very Wrong

U.S. Military Academy cadets traveled this weekend to a farm near Annapolis, Maryland, that is home to Navy mascot Bill, who belongs to a long line of goat mascots with the same name. Cadets gave chase to the spooked goats. And instead of grabbing Bill No. 37, they came away Bill No. 34, a one-horned, 14-year-old retiree, according to The New York Times.

West Point officials would not confirm details of the incident Tuesday, but said the animal was returned safely and that they were investigating those responsible.

A College Football Rivalry Game Prank Went Very Wrong

A College Football Rivalry Game Prank Went Very Wrong

U.S. Military Academy cadets traveled this weekend to a farm near Annapolis, Maryland, that is home to Navy mascot Bill, who belongs to a long line of goat mascots with the same name. Cadets gave chase to the spooked goats. And instead of grabbing Bill No. 37, they came away Bill No. 34, a one-horned, 14-year-old retiree, according to The New York Times.

West Point officials would not confirm details of the incident Tuesday, but said the animal was returned safely and that they were investigating those responsible.

Comments are closed.