The FA Cup’s magic is on display in the third round, with Cambridge, Kidderminster, and Nottingham Forest.

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Cambridge, Kidderminster, and Nottingham Forest have all progressed to the third round of the FA Cup.

The cup’s enduring appeal stems from the fact that it provides a welcome break from the usual narrative – TV executives should take note.

Last year, when Florentino Perez was single-handedly sinking the monstrous European Super League with a series of ill-advised interviews, he claimed the strategy was the only way to capture the attention of bored teenagers who were tuning out football.

His flawed argument was that the sport needed to eliminate the mediocre and create a closed shop of excellence to draw them away from their video games and smartphones.

The kids didn’t want any more Leicesters; instead, they wanted reruns of Real Madrid vs. Juventus – the best of the best, a gleaming, shining testament to flawless excellence.

Perez and his merry band of gamblers believed they had found the solution, but what he was actually describing was TGI McScratchy’s Goodtime Foodrinkery, the Simpsons restaurant where “it’s always New Year’s Eve.”

“It must be wonderful to ring in the New Year over and over again,” Marge Simpson exclaims to a waiter as the band plays Auld Lang Syne once more.

The man serving the champagne deadpans back, “Please kill me.”

Too much of a good thing is bad for everyone, as the joke goes.

Which is perhaps why the FA Cup third round has such enduring appeal, as it always provides something so refreshingly different from football’s usual narrative, which is played out among a cast of (mostly) familiar faces.

The noise, in my opinion, is what distinguishes third round day.

When the unthinkable happens and the underdog wins, the deafening deafening deafening deafening deafening deafening deafening deafening deafening deafening deafening deafening deafening deafening deafening deafening roar deafening deafening deafening de

On Saturday, from level seven of the Leazes End at St James’ Park, the ecstasy among Cambridge fans when Joe Ironside scored tapped right into what keeps the third round weekend relevant.

Fans surfed shoulders punching the air, bodies tumbling down rows of seats in ecstasy.

A beach ball materialized from nowhere.

It was raw, unadulterated emotion that every football fan, regardless of race or ethnicity, could appreciate.

Newcastle was a riot of color and cacophony with 4,000 in the gods.

News summary from Infosurhoy in the United Kingdom.

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