Annular Solar Eclipse 2020: When and where to see rare astronomical display this week

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If you’re a fan of stargazing, make sure you mark June 21 off in your calendar.

That day, an annular solar eclipse is set to appear, and you don’t want to miss it!

An annular solar eclipse occurs when the moon is too far away from the Earth to completely cover the sun, resulting in a ring of light around the darkened moon.

NASA explained: “An annular eclipse happens when the moon is farthest from Earth. Because the moon is farther away from Earth, it seems smaller and does not block the entire view of the sun.”

Here’s everything you need to know about this year’s annular solar eclipse, including what it is and where it will be visible from.

An annular solar eclipse occurs when the moon is too far away from the Earth to completely cover the sun.

This results in a ring of light around the darkened moon.

The annular solar eclipse will take place on June 21 this year.

The peak of the display will be at 07:39 BST, although it won’t be visible from the UK.

Unfortunately for Brits, the annular solar eclipse won’t be visible from the UK.

Instead, the path of the eclipse will begin in central Africa and travel through Saudi Arabia, northern India and southern China, before ending in the Pacific Ocean.

Meanwhile, viewers in eastern Africa, the Middle East and southern Asia will be able to see a partial eclipse.

NASA’s Eclipse Website has a handy interactive map that shows you exactly where the eclipse will be visible.

NASA explained: “The northern and southern path limits are blue and the central line is red. You MUST be somewhere within the central path (between the blue lines) to see the annular phase of the eclipse. The eclipse is longest on the central line (red).

“The yellow lines crossing the path indicate the time and position of maximum eclipse at 10-minute intervals.”

While the annular solar eclipse won’t be visible from the UK, Time and Date will be live streaming the event, so you can watch it here.

Mirror Online will also be sharing photos of the eclipse from around the world, so make sure you check back in on the 21st!

You should never look directly at the sun, even to admire a solar eclipse.

NASA said: “NEVER look at the sun during any type of solar eclipse! Looking at the sun is dangerous. It can damage your eyes.”

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